Borgorosa

A day in Chianti begins

 

By now, it’s not a secret that Mr. TWS and I were smitten with Tuscany on our first visit to the region. Each day brought new experiences in the hilltop villages, historic towns, and countryside. On this day with the promise of more tasty and interesting activities ahead, Mr. TWS and I were driving along Tuscany’s country roads among the vineyards and olive groves enjoying the burst of colorful spring blooms on the wooded hillsides.

Vineyards and olive groves in the Chianti hills of Tuscany

Vineyards and olive groves in the Chianti hills of Tuscany

Tasting Chianti

Chianti, a well-known name to wine drinkers and Italian restaurant patrons worldwide, is a wine zone in Tuscany that grows the grapes used in its namesake wines. What better way to begin a day in Chianti than in one of the foremost wineries of Tuscany with a tour and tasting?

Wine and architecture

Antinori nel Chianti Classico (Cantine Antinori)
Via Cassia per Siena, 133
San Casciano in Val di Pesa, Bargino

Newly opened in October 2012, Cantine Antinori is a striking work of architecture on the Chianti landscape. Created with local materials and a focus on having minimal impact on the environment and saving energy, it complements the natural surroundings of its rural hillside location in Bargino

Tuscany countryside reflected in the glass of the Cantine Antinori in Bargino — innovative architecture designed by Archea Associati in harmony with the landscape

Tuscany countryside reflected in the glass of the Cantine Antinori in Bargino — innovative architecture designed by Archea Associati in harmony with the landscape

Usually, I’m not much for introductory films before tours, but the very interesting video at the beginning of our tour explained the Antinori family’s history in the wine business and particularly how innovation has always been a driving force in their operations. In 1385, Giovanni di Piero Antinori, head of the noble Florentine family, began the centuries-long history of producing wine. Through 26 generations, the family has remained directly involved in management of the winery. Antinori built the new facility and moved its headquarters from Florence to this location to continue advancing their innovative approach to wine making while honoring their long traditions. As Marquis Piero Antinori, current head of the family business, says: “Ancient roots play an important role in our work. But have never been a limit to our innovative spirit”.

Innovative architecture and design of Cantine Antinori -- From top left: A circular skylight fills the lobby with light; "Biosphere 06" art by Tomás Saraceno installed in cellar stairway; ; views of Tuscan hills from lobby; soft and colorful seating in lounge area; looking up through the spiral staircase from the parking lot

Innovative architecture and design of Cantine Antinori — From top left: A circular skylight fills the lobby with light; “Biosphere 06” art by Tomás Saraceno installed in cellar stairway; ; views of Tuscan hills from lobby; soft and colorful seating in lounge area; looking up through the spiral staircase from the parking lot

The geometric and abstract designs of the structure and interior decor are eye-catching as you peruse the Antinori family art collections and information exhibits on the main level. I particularly liked the views of the Tuscan hills and Antinori’s Sangiovese vineyards through the expansive glass windows (top right above).

From top left: Time for tasting after the tour; alluring display of wine bottles in the shop; terracotta vats for olive oil production; vaulted wine cellar

From top left: Time for tasting after the tour; alluring display of wine bottles in the shop; terracotta vats for olive oil production; vaulted wine cellar

 

There are several guided tours available that cover the wine-making process from the vineyard to the bottle and provide an excellent introduction to Antinori wines.

When in Italy … Although still before noon, Mr. TWS and I had no problem sampling a few wines during the tasting at the end of the tour. We began with a Bramito Chardonnay from Umbria that was perfect for early imbibing, followed by two of their signature Chianti Classico vintages. Chianti Classico is a designation that not only refers to a geographic district in Chianti, but also to the particular blend of grapes with Sangiovese being at least 80% of the blend.

Cheese and more wine

Fattoria Corzano e Paterno
Via San Vito di Sopra snc
San Pancrazio, San Casciano

But this day in Chianti wasn’t all about wine. Much to our pleasure, cheese was also involved.

Ancient stone buildings of Fattoria Corzano e Paterno in San Pancrazio, San Casciano, ItalyAncient stone buildings of Fattoria Corzano e Paterno

Ancient stone buildings of Fattoria Corzano e Paterno in San Pancrazio, San Casciano, ItalyAncient stone buildings of Fattoria Corzano e Paterno

 

Across the River Pesa, down winding tree-lined rural roads through hills dotted with Tuscan estates is Fattoria Corzano e Paterno, a family owned and operated cheese factory and winery. In the 1970s, with visions of living closer with the land as he began a new chapter of his life, the late Wendel Gelpke, a Swiss architect, came to Tuscany and bought two centuries-old farms — Corzano (in 1972) and Paterno (in 1976). We were given a tour of the farm by Arianna Gelpke, Wendel’s daughter and the winery’s assistant winemaker.

Touring the cheese factory with Arianna; Antonia’s luscious cheese creations on racks in the factory

Touring the cheese factory with Arianna; Antonia’s luscious cheese creations on racks in the factory

The cheese

Since 1992, the cheeses of Fattoria Corzano e Paterno have been produced by hand using traditional methods using the milk from the farm’s Sardinian sheep, chosen for their adaptability to the hilly terrain of Tuscany. The original small herd of 50 sheep purchased in the early 1970s to help clear the fields for vineyards has grown to 650 sheep, managed by Wendel’s son, Tillo. Reflecting the farm’s belief in sustainability and giving back to the land, the sheep also provide manure that enriches the soil in the vineyards and olive groves.

Antonia, wife of Wendel’s nephew Aljoscha, is a master cheesemaker who has managed the dairy since 1986 and has created many varieties of cheese. Among her inventions are the popular Lingotto (with smoked bacon aromas) and Rocco (a creamy and tangy cheese).

The wine

Aljoscha is the winemaker whose experience began 30 years ago when he helped his uncle on the original six hectares of land, which have grown to 18 hectares. Arianna assists Aljoscha and is in charge of the newer wine cellar built in 2005. Their grape varieties include Sangiovese, Canaiolo, Malvasia, Trebbiano(each common to the Chianti area), as well as other varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Chardonnay.

The tasting

A highlight was sampling the freshness of Corzano e Paterno with a wine and cheese tasting in the courtyard in front of the shop where their wine, cheese, cured meats, and other local products can be purchased. On this warm afternoon with flowers in bloom, the Il Corzanello Toscana IGT Bianco was a perfect accompaniment to the cheeses we sampled (described below). We also tasted one of their red wines, Terre di Corzano Chianti, a Sangiovese and Canaiolo blend, and we couldn’t resist buying a bottle before we left.

Top left: Marzolino (soft cheese like mozzarella), Erbolino (fresh pecorino with garlic, parsley and hot pepper), and goat cheese; on the terrace with our guide Babeth and Arianna enjoying Il Corzanello Bianco 2014; fresh eggs in the shop; beautiful irises at the dairy

Top left: Marzolino (soft cheese like mozzarella), Erbolino (fresh pecorino with garlic, parsley and hot pepper), and goat cheese; on the terrace with our guide Babeth and Arianna enjoying Il Corzanello Bianco 2014; fresh eggs in the shop; beautiful irises at the dairy

 

Luxury country holiday villas

Within easy reach of Cantine Antinori and Corzano e Paterno are two of Este Villa’s luxury holiday rentals near the town of San Casciano, Borgorosa and Casa Mattei. Although we didn’t stay in these villas, we toured both of these properties and were instantly impressed with them as options for stays in Chianti. Each is distinctive in its accommodations and amenities, but being in the heart of Chianti, they both share convenient accessibility to many of Tuscany’s alluring cities and attractions, including the gorgeous Renaissance city of Florence which is only 18 km.

Borgorosa holiday rentals in a restored barn and olive mill

Borgorosa holiday rentals in a restored barn and olive mill

Filled with history in a secluded setting among the cypress trees of the Chianti hills is Borgorosa, a historic estate with holiday rentals. At the beautiful and grand villa adjacent to the rentals, Mr. TWS and I enjoyed meeting the owners, Andrea and his wife Claudia whose family has owned the property since the 1700s. During a tour and gourmet Tuscan lunch with our gracious hosts, we also liked learning about the history of the villa.

A memorable dining experience in Renaissance ambiance with Andrea and Claudia in their villa

A memorable dining experience in Renaissance ambiance with Andrea and Claudia in their villa

The villa was first built in the 13th century as a lookout tower to watch for enemy factions. As many of these types of structures in Italy, it was subsequently destroyed and rebuilt during the following centuries. In 1520, the villa was purchased by the famous Florentine noble, Matteo Strozzi, for a summer residence. He had it enlarged and decorated in grand Renaissance style by the most important sculptors and painters of the time. We had a glimpse of some of the ornate and richly-furnished rooms of the villa, including a stunning ballroom, but because photography was not allowed we are not able to share. The private chapel has stunning frescoes (top left below) painted by Michele Tosini, a student of Ridolfo del Ghirlandaio, a renowned Renaissance painter. Claudia’s ancestors in the Cancellieri Ganucci family bought the villa from Strozzi in the 1700s.

cr Borgorosa ev

 

Besides being a summer home for the nobility, the villa has seen its share of history through the centuries. According to Claudia’s grandfather’s diary, during World War II the villa was first occupied by the German Stasi command and then by the American army when the Germans had withdrawn.

Crossing the wide expanse of lawn to the Borgorosa holiday rental buildings from the family villa

Crossing the wide expanse of lawn to the Borgorosa holiday rental buildings from the family villa

Across a wide expanse of lawn from the main house are Borgorosa’s holiday rentals located in two buildings (shown above and below).

Borgorosa rental unit with private courtyard and outdoor dining area

Borgorosa rental unit with private courtyard and outdoor dining area

Andrea and Claudia have shown great style in the furnishings of the rental units (completely restored in 2011) using classic terracotta floors, original artwork, and tasteful antiques. A few of the comfortable and cozy rooms of the units are shown below.

A glimpse of interior rooms of Borgorosa units

A glimpse of interior rooms of Borgorosa units

Five units accommodating up to 22 people in 11 bedrooms are located in the restored buildings — three in the former olive oil mill and two in what was previously the barn. The units can be rented separately or together. Each unit has full kitchens, living areas, and private outdoor areas for al fresco dining in addition to outdoor common areas for all guests. Below the units among the olive trees is the inviting pool. Nearby activities that may interest guests include horseback riding, golf, and tennis.

Lawn and terrace of a Borgorosa unit overlooking pool surrounded by olive trees

Lawn and terrace of a Borgorosa unit overlooking pool surrounded by olive trees

Borgorosa seemed a great spot for a couple’s getaway or for large group and family gatherings, especially with the elegant loggia in the villa that would be perfect for special occasions

 

Casa Mattei

At Borgorosa, we were met by Babeth, the lovely property manager of Casa Mattei, the next villa we would be visiting just a few minutes away, partially along an unpaved road. At first sight, I knew I would be taken with Casa Mattei, a former monastery that dates back a thousand years

Casa Mattei

Casa Mattei

The building was completely restored in 2006 and its rooms were meticulously decorated in contemporary fashion. Enjoying refreshments with Babeth on the terrace with expansive views of the wooded countryside, I could easily envision a festive family gathering or vacation with friends here.

 

Enjoying refreshments on the terrace of Casa Mattei

Enjoying refreshments on the terrace of Casa Mattei

Casa Mattei’s spacious and beautifully-designed interior looked ideal for family and group gatherings, accommodating 5 to 6 couples or a family of up to 14 people. The main rooms include a large dining room that opens onto the terrace, two kitchens, a spacious living room, cozy sitting rooms, five bedrooms (each with a private bathroom), and a wine cellar.

Spacious living areas, large kitchen, bright dining area, and wine cellar of Casa Mattei

Spacious living areas, large kitchen, bright dining area, and wine cellar of Casa Mattei

Next to the villa is a separate small and charming building (shown below bottom left) that can sleep 2 additional people.

Olive trees and flowers on the grounds; outdoor pizza oven (top right); separate unit (bottom left)

Olive trees and flowers on the grounds; outdoor pizza oven (top right); separate unit (bottom left)

I felt the peaceful character of Casa Mattei as we strolled with Babeth on the lawn outside to the organic gardens (where they grow artichokes, tomatoes, zucchini, and other vegetables), the olive groves, and next to the freshwater mosaic-tiled swimming pool. The view of the pool and villa below seems to epitomize the luxury of life in Chianti

the pool

the pool

And so a day in Chianti ends

We would have liked to spend more time relishing the ambiance of Borgorosa and Casa Mattei, tasting wine, and enjoying the company of the gracious people we met this day. Passed by an occasional Ferrari (apparently a popular tourist driving experience in Tuscany), we were on our way through the beautiful countryside while reflecting on our day and looking forward to the next day’s exploration in Tuscany.

Ferrari-spotting on the country road in the Chianti hills of Tuscany

Ferrari-spotting on the country road in the Chianti hills of Tuscany

 

by Catherine Sweeney  nov 2 2015

Grazie to our hosts at Borgorosa and Casa Mattei for making our day in Chianti so enjoyable.

Take a look at the EsteVillas website for details, more photos, and booking information for Borgorosa, Casa Mattei, and other properties in their collection.

 

Antinori Winery via Cassia per Siena 133
Loc. Bargino 50026 San Casciano Val di Pesa -Firenzeto book a visit  http://www.hospitalityantinorichianticlassico.it/Default.aspx

 

Corzano & Paterno – Via San Vito di Sopra, snc – 50020 San Casciano in Val di Pesa – Florence – Tuscany – Italy – tel. +39 055 8248 179

 

Borgorosa  and Casa Mattei  are both located in the heart of Chianti

Writers, artists, and pilgrims have for centuries been inspired by the villages and hilltops of Tuscany. And no wonder. During our visit, I was constantly in awe of the historic towns with their turrets and towers atop the hills. Certaldo Alta and San Gimignano, two of the region’s most notable hilltop towns, exemplified the Tuscany of medieval times and the beauty of modern-day Tuscany. On our first full day in the region on our way to lunch at Casa Egle, a luxury villa near Montespertoli, we got a glimpse of each town accompanied by our gracious host and owner of the villa, Egle Nossan.

Towers of San Gimignano on a hilltop of Tuscany

Towers of San Gimignano on a hilltop of Tuscany

A short walk through history

  • San Gimignano

Egle enthusiastically recommended that we see the historic center of San Gimignano, a key stop on the Via Francigena (the ancient road and pilgrimage route to and from Rome), even for just a short while to walk in the footsteps of history. It’s a very popular town for visitors who marvel at its famous towers, remnants of medieval times. As we made our way to the highest point of the town, along every street and in every piazza of this UNESCO World Heritage Site, there were enticing scenes and a bustle of activity.

 

Via San Giovanni (in background) is Torre Grossa (left) and Torre Becci (right)

Via San Giovanni (in background) is Torre Grossa (left) and Torre Becci (right)

 The towers of San Gimignano form a striking skyline. Walking the narrow streets, you gaze up at these imposing sights as you would skyscrapers in a large city. The first towers were built by clans in the Middle Ages to watch for rival forces. Then throughout the centuries, additional towers were added to demonstrate power and wealth. At its peak, San Gimignano had 72 towers. Two of the remaining 14 towers can be seen partially in the photo above

 

Stairs to Piazza della Madonna (left) and shops on Via Giovanni (right)

Stairs to Piazza della Madonna (left) and shops on Via Giovanni (right)

San Gimignano is famous for its hand-painted ceramics, and we saw several shops, especially along the main street Via San Giovanni which is also lined with restaurants, and galleries. We passed many places that beckoned me to get a closer look. With more time, I would have visited each one, turned down every alley, and leisurely people-watched in the piazzas of San Gimignano. But I was grateful just to see this beautiful town and soak up its medieval ambiance.

 

Torre Becci and archway on Via San Giovanni

Torre Becci and archway on Via San Giovanni

 

Above is a closer look at Torre Becci as we were about to go through the archway beneath it.

 

Devil's Tower

Torre del Diavolo (Devil’s Tower) on Piazza della Cisterna

There’s an element of pleasant surprise when you pass through the arch as it opens onto beautiful Piazza della Cisterna. To the right, you see the ancient well (built in 1273) surrounded by homes, former palaces, and Towers

 

Piazza della Cisterna, Torri degli Ardinghelli (two shorter towers facing Piazza della Cisterna) in front of Torre Grossa

Piazza della Cisterna, Torri degli Ardinghelli (two shorter towers facing Piazza della Cisterna) in front of Torre Grossa

Still climbing upward on Via San Giovanni along the left side of the square, we entered Piazza del Duomo, named for the basilica located there, Collegiata di Santa Maria Assunta (Collegiate Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary).

Piazza del Duomo and Basilica Collegiata di Santa Maria Assunta

Piazza del Duomo and Basilica Collegiata di Santa Maria Assunta

 

Torre Rognosa rising above the Palazzo Comunale on Piazza del Duomo with Torre Chigi, the lower tower on its left

Torre Rognosa rising above the Palazzo Comunale on Piazza del Duomo with Torre Chigi, the lower tower on its left

Caffe on Piazza delle Erbe

Caffe on Piazza delle Erbe

 

 Rocca di Montestaffoli, sculpture by Nic Jonk


Rocca di Montestaffoli, sculpture by Nic Jonk

Finally reaching Rocca di Montestaffoli, the castle built by the Florentines in 1353 for protection against potential attacks by rival Siena, we took in the panoramic views of the area from the highest point in San Gimignano.

The tree-shaded courtyard where people come to relax is a nice place to have lunch and enjoy the views. Located there is a “Sole e Acqua” (“Water and Sunshine”), a sculpture by Danish artist Nic Jonk. It’s one of several contemporary art works that have been installed around the town.

 

  • Certaldo

As we rounded a bend in the road on our way to Certaldo Alta, my first view of the town was a stunning sight.

Certaldo Alta

Certaldo Alta

The statue (below left) in the lower, newer part of Certaldo pays homage to the writer and poet Giovanni Boccaccio (1313-1375) who lived and died in Certaldo. His greatest works were The Decameron and On Famous Women, and he is often credited with Petrarch as being a founder of Renaissance humanism.

Statue of Giovanni Boccaccio and funicular railway

Statue of Giovanni Boccaccio and funicular railway

The ancient treasures of Certaldo are in its upper historic center, Certaldo Alta. To begin our stroll there, we opted to take the funicular railway to reach Via Giovanni Boccaccio in just a couple of minutes. It is also reachable on foot (about a 10 minute walk), but there’s something fun about riding funiculars.

 

View of hills and countryside from Certaldo Alta

View of hills and countryside from Certaldo Alta

Once at the top, I felt like I had gone back in time to the early Renaissance as much of the upper town is well preserved. In the distance in the photo above, you can see the towers of San Gimignano through a slight morning haze.

Wouldn’t it be lovely to have lunch at the cozy spot pictured below?

Restaurant and old buildings of Certaldo Alta

Restaurant and old buildings of Certaldo Alta

I enjoyed walking along the vicolos (alleys) and narrow streets with ivy-covered buildings while catching glimpses of the countryside and hills beyond. Notice the circular covers on the wall in the photo on the left below? Since buildings in medieval times didn’t have foundations, supports were put through walls to reinforce them.

Left: A vicolo in Certaldo with potted plants on the ledge of the left wall Right: Views of the Tuscan countryside between two buildings

Left: A vicolo in Certaldo with potted plants on the ledge of the left wall Right: Views of the Tuscan countryside between two buildings

 

Egle and I in front of the Palazzo Pretorio

Egle and I in front of the Palazzo Pretorio

 

A peek inside the Palazzo Pretorio and murals on the ceilings and walls

A peek inside the Palazzo Pretorio and murals on the ceilings and walls

The Palazzo Pretorio, originally a castle complete with a chapel and dungeons, is at the top of Via Boccaccio. Unfortunately, it was not open for visitors when we arrived, but we peeked over the gate to get a look at the archway to the courtyard to see the murals.

 

the terrace of Palazzo Pretorio, typical Certaldo Alta buildings in the background

the terrace of Palazzo Pretorio, typical Certaldo Alta buildings in the background

Standing on the terrace of the palazzo, Egle and I enjoyed a nice view of neighboring buildings with Certaldo’s signature red bricks and adorned with flower pots and classic Tuscan shutters.

 

  • The good life at Casa Egle

After our brief explorations of the two towns, Egle brought us back to Casa Egle for lunch and a visit. Although the structure of Casa Egle was originally built around 1100 A.D. and would have centuries of its own stories to tell, the villa and the surrounding property most quickly brings to mind a blissful image of the Tuscan good life which we enjoyed while having lunch under the Tuscan sun with the owners, Egle and Claudia.

 

Enjoying the good life at Casa Egle on a hilltop in Montespertoli

Enjoying the good life at Casa Egle on a hilltop in Montespertoli

On this typically mild and sunny day in May with the vast vineyard and hill views, Casa Egle seemed to capture the essence of tranquility. In its serene location in the Tuscan hills and with plenty of privacy, the villa seemed a great place to enjoy a family gathering or getaway with friends. The villa also provides a location from which to easily explore the sights and attractions of the region.

Views of the Tuscan hills, vineyards and olive groves from Casa Egle

Views of the Tuscan hills, vineyards and olive groves from Casa Egle

 

With Egle on the walkway to Casa Egle

With Egle on the walkway to Casa Egle

The exterior is very welcoming with trees and flowers everywhere. The roses were in bloom during our visit and the sight and smell was intoxicating. The saltwater pool and its private cabana looked so inviting that I’m sure at least one pool party would be part of any getaway with family and friends.

 

 The villa, grounds, and saltwater pool of Casa Egle


The villa, grounds, and saltwater pool of Casa Egle

Before lunch, we toured the interior of the stylishly-restored and beautifully-maintained villa which was ready accept its first guests for the summer.

As Egle showed us around, I began to envy the guests who would be arriving soon. Blended with modern features were touches of traditional Tuscan terra cotta tiles and wooden beamed ceilings. The following photos show only a few of the rooms.

 

 Living and reading rooms, dining room of Casa Egle


Living and reading rooms, dining room of Casa Egle

Mr. TWS and I loved the warm character of each individually-decorated room with tasteful colors and fixtures, including the master suite, two additional double bedrooms, a bedroom with two single beds, and four full bright and pleasant baths with quality amenities.

Three of the four bedroom and one of the four bathrooms

Three of the four bedroom and one of the four bathrooms

Although it’s not a secret that I’m not one for doing a lot of cooking or baking, the bright airy kitchen at Casa Egle made me almost want to don an apron and get cooking. Fortunately, lunch was beautifully prepared by Claudia and Egle instead.

On such a lovely day, we had lunch on the patio where we savored a delicious pasta with walnut sauce for which I still have cravings and fond memories. We also had homemade unsalted bread, a traditional Florentine recipe that legend says originated when Pisa withheld salt shipments to Florence during the frequent wars between the two rivals. While relaxing in the quiet setting with our hosts, we also got our first, but not last, taste of a silky and smooth Italian dessert wine, Vin Santo. Tradition dictates that biscotti is dipped in the wine.

 

 

From the fruit of their fig trees, Egle and Claudia make their own jams, and with unripe green walnuts , they make Nocino, a dark brown sweet liqueur. The season to pick the walnuts is during May and June, and the following fermentation takes several months. Nocino is often used for dessert ingredients and toppings. Egle and Claudia also sell their extra virgin olive oil under their “Poggio Rosemary” brand.

 

Above: Fermenting of the walnuts and other ingredients for Nocino (left) and white figs for jams (right); Below: the finished products (Photos courtesy of Poggio Rosemary)

Bright and airy kitchen; lunch of pasta with walnut sauce followed by biscotti and Vin Santo

Foodie tip: We passed many acacia trees with white buds floating in the air (in California, ours are yellow) as we drove along country roads to the villa. Did you know that acacia flowers can be eaten? Egle told us about a basic recipe for acacia flower fritters which includes mixing flour, beer, and salt, and then cooking the flowers with the mixture in hot oil, but there are many variations of the recipe.

 

Roses in bloom on the grounds of Casa Egle; the wishing well; and “Green House” in the background where bikes for guests are stored

Above: Fermenting of the walnuts and other ingredients for Nocino (left) and white figs for jams (right); Below: the finished products (Photos courtesy of Poggio Rosemary)

Bicycles for exploring the area are stored in the “Green House”, the small shed beyond the well that Egle was showing me in the photo above. Besides biking, there are a number of recreational and cultural activities such as winery visits, cooking classes, hot-air ballooning, golfing, excursions to Florence (20 miles) and Siena (30 miles), and visits to Certaldo, San Gimigano and other Tuscan towns. Egle and Claudia are clearly committed to providing their villa guests with customized experiences from peaceful retreats to active vacations. Among many other reasons I’d like to come back to Tuscany would be to go cycling through villages and countryside. I should have made a wish for that at the wishing well before we left.

Roses in bloom on the grounds of Casa Egle; the wishing well; and “Green House” in the background where bikes for guests are stored

Roses in bloom on the grounds of Casa Egle; the wishing well; and “Green House” in the background where bikes for guests are stored

In just our short time with Egle and Claudia, their warmth brought us to quickly feel welcome and relaxed in their company. Many thanks to them for their lovely hospitality and letting us share in the good life on their Tuscan hilltop.

Take a look at the EsteVillas website for details and booking information for Casa Egle and other properties in their collection.

Catherine Sweeney  Traveling with Sweeney

Villas in the Certaldo and San Gimignano area :

EGLE, BORGOROSA, MATTEI, NOVELLINA, RAFFAELLA, CONTI

Villas in Tuscany ,