Veneto

Five great things to do in Veneto

From our romantic apartment in Asolo, we not only enjoyed the culture and lifestyle of the captivating town just beyond our doorstop, we had easy access to other wonders of the Veneto region of Italy on side trips during our four-day stay.

Bassano del Grappa — view from Ponte Vecchio

Bassano del Grappa — view from Ponte Vecchio

 

With our expert guides and gracious hosts Mr. TWS and I explored highlights that included regional wine, art, and architecture. Here are five places that we recommend for your Veneto itinerary.

Villa di Maser

Along Veneto’s Strada dell’Architettura (Architectural Road) are numerous examples of the exquisite architecture of Andrea Palladio (born in Padua in 1508). The style is characterized by the symmetry and proportions of classical Greek and Roman architecture, especially temples. Another common characteristic is the portico with arches and columns that provide the unique appearance of the front of the building. The distinct Palladian architectural style spread to England, other European countries, and also to North America. For example, the design of the White House in Washington D.C. was influenced by the Palladian style.

Villa di Maser

Villa di Maser

 

We visited Villa di Maser (officially known as Villa Barbaro del Palladio) in Maser, just about 7 km from Asolo. The villa (with the 230 hectares of agricultural land upon which it sits) has been owned by several different important families over the years. We were warmly greeted by the villa’s current owner, Count Vittorio dalle Ore whose wife is of the Diamante family who bought the property in 1934 and restored it after WWII.

With Vittorio Dalle Ore, the estate winery, one of two sundials on the facade, and the Nymphaeum of the villa’s garden

With Vittorio Dalle Ore, the estate winery, one of two sundials on the facade, and the Nymphaeum of the villa’s garden

 

Open to the public since the 1930s, Villa Maser was included as part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site designation of “City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto” in 1996. In the six rooms that can be toured, visitors can admire the beautiful frescoes of Paolo Veronese (which took ten years to paint) and sculptures by Alessandro Vittoria, considered important works of the Venetian Renaissance. The family lives in the villa and there are a a few spots where you can get a glimpse of the living quarters. Also seen from inside is the Nymphaeum (a classical Greek/Roman arched wall which was a monument to the nymphs), a beautiful garden, and a fishing pool. The estate has also been making wine since 1560 on 33 hectares of vineyards, important to the economy of the villa since its early days.

Possagno – The Land of Canova

Veneto is very rich in art of many types, particularly in an area that our guide referred to as the “Golden Triangle” of artists and painters roughly defined by the vertices of Castel Franco to Possagno to our base in Asolo.

In Possagno, the birthplace of neo-classical sculptor Antonio Canova (1757 – 1822), we had some surprises relating to the great sculptor. First was the sight of the imposing 19th-century hillside temple that Canova designed and where he is buried. The Temple of Canova, designed and financed by Canova, looks like an ancient Roman/Greek temple nestled on an isolated hilltop against a mountain backdrop. As dramatic as the building and setting, a stunning patterned mosaic lies before it leading up to the impressive steps before the portico. The temple looks very much like the Pantheon in Rome. But Canova’s surprises weren’t through for us this day.

Temple of Canova in Possagno

Temple of Canova in Possagno

 

Our next surprise was Museo Canova, Passagno’s museum dedicated to the famous sculptor. Its unassuming exterior left us unprepared for what was inside. Within were many of the actual works of Canova that were steps in the creation of his sculpture before committing to marble; they provided a comprehensive representation of his art. The first room you enter contains paintings, drawings and sculptures of Canova which leads outside to a separate building, the Gipsoteca. The building, composed of two large halls, was filled with the plaster cast models of many of Canova’s sculptures, works that are in famous art museums of the world, such as Psyche Revived by Cupid’s Kiss in the Louvre and Perseus Triumphant in the Vatican. The casts are made from the initial clay sculptures as the step before committing to marble.

During World War I, a bomb damaged many of the statues in the Gipsoteca, but they were carefully restored by Possagno artists, Stefano and Siro Serafin. The museum also includes a library, and a courtyard garden. To one side of the garden is the home where Canova was born. On exiting the museum, there was one more surprise we hadn’t noticed on the way into the museum. As you exit, you view across a stone paved area, up an impressive stairway that directly funnels your vantage up the hill to showcase a view of the temple.

Bassano del Grappa

Buildings of Bassano del Grappa (liberty style seen at the top) and Ponte Vecchio over the River Brenta

Buildings of Bassano del Grappa (liberty style seen at the top) and Ponte Vecchio over the River Brenta

Bassano del Grappa is a lively, international city that attracts tourists from all over the world, and also has attracted many current residents who have come here to live from other places. In fact, as we strolled around town, Mr. TWS and I contemplated how great it would be to live there ourselves. Bassano del Grappa dates back to Roman times and is famously known as the ceramics capital of Northern Italy, as the birthplace of grappa (the liquor distilled of the grape remains from the winemaking process, i.e. the skins, pulp, seeds, and stems), and for architectural gems in its beautiful location along the Brenta River. We were able to spend the afternoon here walking the town and exploring some of its locations and sites.

Ponte Vecchio, the wooden covered bridge that spans the river, is the city’s symbol and a famous symbol of Italy. It was designed in 1569 (though earlier versions go back to the early 13th century) by Palladio, and destroyed and rebuilt many times, including the last time during World War II. After the war, it was reconstructed by the Alpini, the elite mountain force of the Italian army, and from that day the bridge has also been called Ponte degli Alpini (Bridge of the Alpine Soldiers). World War I also was key to the city’s history and nearby Mount Grappa was the site of many fierce battles. To honor those who died in the battle, the city name Bassano Veneto was changed to Bassano del Grappa.

During WWI, Ernest Hemingway stayed many days in Bassano del Grappa recuperating from injuries received when the ambulance he was driving was struck by a mortar. The experience became part of the basis for A Farewell to Arms which is commemorated in the city’s Heminway and Great War Museum that particularly portrays aspects of American involvement in WWI from an Italian perspective.

 

Museo Poli Grappa Museum entrance and collection; having a taste of grappa at the Nardini Distillery

Museo Poli Grappa Museum entrance and collection; having a taste of grappa at the Nardini Distillery

Of course, we couldn’t pass up a taste of grappa while here. We started at the Poli Grappa Museum, which has interesting exhibits including the copper cauldrons used in distillation of grape pomace and a collection of grappas from Italian distilleries.  I didn’t before realize that there was such a variety of styles of grappa with different tastes depending on several factors, including the vines, the vintage, the aging, distillation process, and herbal and aromatic infusions. The Poli family has been making grappa since 1898. Poli also has a larger museum in Schiavon, 12 km from Bssano del Grappa.

At the Ponte Vecchio is the store and tasting room of the Nardini Distillery, where Bortolo Nardini invented and first produced grappa in 1779. The old and historic tasting room has a large bar with artifacts from early distilling days and displays of the many products today. We sat by a window in an adjoining room which gave us a great view of the river below.

Tempted by a menu of delicious-looking grappa cocktails, I still chose a basic sample (one that was quite smooth, contrary to how many think of grappa’s characteristics. I would definitely like to come back to Bassano del Grappa to walk around some more and also see other attractions, such as the Duomo, the castle, the ceramics museum, and the Hemingway and Great War Museum.

Treviso – City of Art and Water

One of the largest cities in Veneto, Treviso was another side trip that we would recommend as a must if staying in Asolo or visiting Veneto. We spent about a half day walking around (but clearly there’s more to do in Treviso to warrant at least several days) and we loved the city. There are a lot references we saw to Treviso as a little Venice and we could easily see why. In particular, the water and canals remind one of Venice as well as narrow winding streets and colorful period buildings and houses.

With Mr. TWS in lovely Treviso

With Mr. TWS in lovely Treviso

 

Entering the city by way of one of its three gateways through the well-preserved 15th-century walls, we admired many of Treviso’s liberty-style buildings (such as the one in Bassano del Grappa that grabbed my attention). We mostly walked the city center which on this Saturday in May was bustling.  From our parking spot we passed the Benetton Treviso rugby stadium – needless to say we were surprised to find rugby as opposed to football in Italy. The professional rugby team is owned by the Benetton clothing company, headquartered here.  Trevios has a Roman design with its right angle roads and it bears similarities to Venice particularly with its winding streets, and numerous canals and bridges.

 

Fresh seafood, white asparagus, and artichokes at the markets in Treviso

Fresh seafood, white asparagus, and artichokes at the markets in Treviso

Saturday was market day in Treviso, which added to the bustle. We enjoyed seeing the fish market (open every day Tuesday through Saturday) located in the middle of a small island in the Canale Cagnan. Surrounded by the canal, it was one of Mr. TWS favorite spots in Treviso.
Art of Treviso — sculptures on the river (left), photographer Alessandro Trevisin (top right), Fontana delle Tette (bottom right)

Art of Treviso — sculptures on the river (left), photographer Alessandro Trevisin (top right), Fontana delle Tette (bottom right)

Wonderful elements of art and water are seen throughout Treviso, e.g., as in the sculptures on the canals in the pictures above. The Fontana delle Tette (in English, he Fountain of Tits) is a reproduction of the famous statue and symbol of the city originally build in 1559 providing water during a severe drought. Back then at various times of celebration, the fountain poured red wine from one nipple and white wine from the other; it certainly captures your attention. At the church of San Francesco, we met a photographer, Alessandro Trevisin, who was exhibiting a collection of his photographs representing colorful geometric patterns present in close-ups of everyday objects.

For lunch, we sat outside at Cantinetta Venegazzù on Piazza Giannino Ancillotto for a tasty sampling of local cheese, ham, and bread accompanied with Prosecco. Just a few yards away is Le Beccherie, the restaurant that claims creation of tiramisu (though another restaurant in Treviso and others in Italy claim that they were first).

The Prosecco Road and Villa Sandi

Reminiscent of wine routes such as in the Napa Valley is Veneto’s Strada del Prosecco (Prosecco Road) that runs from Valdobiadene to Coneglano through the hillside vineyards that make up the regions DOC. It’s in the hills of Cartizze where the best grapes for Prosecco are produced. This area along the River Piave has historic significance, too. This is where during WWI and WWII, the Italian people fought significant battles that ended these wars.

In the Cartizze hills along the Prosecco Road

In the Cartizze hills along the Prosecco Road

 

Villa Sandi in Crocetta del Montello is the biggest wine estate of the area located between the COCG area of Prosecco of Valdobbiadene and DOC area of the Montello and Colli Asolani.  The villa is a Palladian-style beauty that was built in 1622 and has been in owner Giancarlo Moretti Polegato’s family for many generations

 

Tunnels, Murano chandeliers, and Prosecco tasting at Villa Sandi

Tunnels, Murano chandeliers, and Prosecco tasting at Villa Sandi

 

A big treat is a tour of the 18th century underground cellars that stretch out for over 1.5 km under the villa. The tunnels were used as military headquarters in WWI. The humidity and constant temperature of the galleries provide the perfect environment for the wine. Bottles of Villa Sandi’s classic method sparkling wine “Opere Trevigiane” are stored here. The tour ends with a generous tasting of Prosecco Superiore, one of the winery’s premier vintages that we also enjoyed later with a bottle that we took back to our apartment.

The villa itself is beautiful and I was really impressed with the gorgeous Murano chandeliers in several of the rooms open to the public.

Other Veneto Highlights

Asolo is a great place to visit and it is well situated as a central point for visiting many sites and attractions in Veneto. The ones we mention here were the side trips we did in just a 4-day Asolo stay. We could imagine a much longer stay affording time to spend more time just in Asolo, more time on the side trips mentioned here, and going further afield in the region.

We talked to our hosts about what other places to see in Veneto on a return visit. Here are a few of them:

  • Vicenza — Sites to see include the basilica, the theater, and Villa Almerico Capra (also known as La Rotonda), another masterpiece of Andrea Palladio.
  • Padua — The setting for much of Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew, some of Padua’s key sites are the historical center, a famous caffè frequented by Padua artists, the market which is open every day, the largest square in Europe, and the Basilica San Antonio.
  • Verona — Verona is well-known as a setting in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet (the fictitious Juliet’s balcony) and was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site for its many historical buildings, some dating to Roman  times. The arena in Verona hosts many special events such as summer operas.
  • Marostica — Besides its imposing castle and ancient city walls, Marostica is known for its traditional human chess festival held every two years in September. I would love to see that!
Statue of Alpini soldier kissing his sweetheart goodbye in Bassano del Grappa

Statue of Alpini soldier kissing his sweetheart goodbye in Bassano del Grappa

Goodbye to the Veneto and on to Venice!

Arriving in Venice by boat as a light rain falls

Arriving in Venice by boat as a light rain falls

 

Directly from Asolo, we headed to the fairytale-like capital of Veneto — Venice. We went by car to Portegrandi where we embarked on the Silis, a tour boat operated by Navigazione Stefanato, a family-owned and operated Italian river cruise company, to arrive in Venice by boat. The four-hour cruise included delicious fresh seafood snacks and generous pours of Prosecco. Mr. TWS loved the delicious fried smelt served by the plateful by the fun and courteous crew. The cruise also included a stop in Murano for a glass-blowing demonstration and a quick walk around.  We got to see many other islands in the Venetian lagoon and the beautiful views of the city as we arrived. In the photo above, you can see the very cool surreal look of the city that was created by the light rain that was falling. It was a great way to travel and arrive in Venice. Check out Navigazione Stefanato for more about their tours and services.

Map showing our Veneto highlights locations

itinerary

itinerary

by Catherine Sweeney Traveling with Sweeney

Villas and apartments in the area

Asolina and Elena in Asolo

 

Romance in Asolo, “The City of a Hundred Horizons”

Mr. TWS in a romantic mood in Asolo — Photo credit: Federica Donadi

Mr. TWS in a romantic mood in Asolo — Photo credit: Federica Donadi

 

I often think of Asolo. Since our April visit to this town in the Veneto region of northeastern Italy, I’ve thought back fondly to many moments of our stay there. The picture-perfect hilltop town exudes romance with its winding lanes, beautiful villas, galleries, cafes, and fabulous views from its lofty position. In part, this explains why great writers and artists have loved the town and found inspiration here. Robert Browning (for whom a street in the city center is named), Ernest Hemingway, and Henry James are just a few who came to Asolo as frequent visitors or residents.

One of Asolo’s stunning views from the panoramic vista point of Queen Cornaro’s Castle

One of Asolo’s stunning views from the panoramic vista point of Queen Cornaro’s Castle

Italian poet Giosuè Carducci called Asolo “The City of a Hundred Horizons”, aptly describing the many beautiful panoramic views of mountains and the Veneto countryside its hillside setting provides. From vantage points during walks in town or from the windows of our EsteVillas Elena apartment, we took in the character and scenery of Asolo for four days and nights — a time that proved to be too short. Like the horizons to which Carducci referred, there are a hundred reasons why our stay in Asolo, a town I only recently learned about, touched us so much. Here are a few of the highlights of our stay.

Our romantic “Elena” apartment in Asolo

Elena-building

“Elena” apartments above Caffé Centrale on Piazza Garibaldi

Fitting the romantic character of Asolo are the two beautifully-renovated apartments (top two floors shown in the photo above) owned by our host Elena Benassi. We stayed on the top floor and the other apartment was on the second floor (1st floor in European terms) just below it. The two apartments are above the iconic Caffé Centrale on the ground level. Our “Elena 3” apartment consisted of three bedrooms, four baths, full bright kitchen, and elegant living and dining areas. Elena’s impeccable style was evident with the carefully-selected antique furnishings and stylish finishes throughout. The decor preserves the architectural style of the building and a sense of a romantic past.

 

Elena 3 apartment dining and living area

Elena 3 apartment dining and living area

 

From the windows of our apartment, I drank in the sights of historic Asolo — the fountain on the small piazza below, picturesque buildings lining the square, and the lane leading up to the majestic castle of Queen Caterina Cornaro. It was a great, central location to feel part of Asolo life and enjoy the town with easy walking to attractions and restaurants.

Room with a view: Queen Cornaro’s Castle seen from our “Elena” apartment on Piazza Garibaldi in Asolo

Room with a view: Queen Cornaro’s Castle seen from our “Elena” apartment on Piazza Garibaldi in Asolo

A warm and delicious welcome to Asolo

We had the pleasure of spending time with Elena and our EsteVillas trip organizer Beatrice at a delightful welcome dinner prepared by a local chef, Maurizio Gallina — right in the kitchen of our charming Asolo apartment. We enjoyed fresh regional dishes and fine wines during a relaxing dinner with lively conversation about the attractions of Asolo and the Veneto region.

Chef-Maurizio

As the chef was busy in the kitchen, we began with a sampling of appetizers including fried parmesan and zucchini flowers accompanied by a refreshing glass of Prosecco. Although I couldn’t fool anyone that I really participated in the meal preparation, Chef Maurizio was kind to let me give the risotto a few stirs, too

Herb, borage leaves and ricotta pie (top right), white asparagus and egg salad (bottom right), and delectable tiramisu

Herb, borage leaves and ricotta pie (top right), white asparagus and egg salad (bottom right), and delectable tiramisu

On the menu for our feast was a delicious array of the chef’s recipes of local dishes using primarily products of the Veneto region. Top among the ingredients was white asparagus that was perfectly in season during in April. While in Asolo, we enjoyed white asparagus served in many dishes and styles, but Chef Maurizio’s asparagus and egg salad was one of the most creative and delicious. Another key component of our special meal was a risotto made with Vialone Nano, a rice variety grown in Veneto. With each course, Chef Maurizio paired an appropriate wine —  Maculan Vespaiolo, a Veneto white wine, was perfect with the asparagus.

It was quite a start for our stay and we would highly recommend including a private dinner of your own prepared by Chef Maurizio when you stay in Asolo. As a “chef on demand”, he specializes in private dinners like this and he also offers cooking classes. These options are among the extra services that you can easily arrange when renting one of Elena’s apartments.

More highlights of our stay in Asolo

Walks around town

Though our hosts kept us quite busy with the many entertaining and informative side trips outside of town, we also enjoyed the time we spent just walking Asolo’s winding lanes past shops and restaurants, medieval buildings, historical sites, and landmarks.

 

Cathy-and-Mr-TWS

Admiring ancient frescoes during a walk in Asolo — Photo credit: Federica Donadi

 

One of the many shops that attracted our attentions as we strolled was Asolo Kilim Gallery where we could have spent hours admiring the colorful and eclectic selection of art, textiles, jewelry and antiques. We were thrilled to get a look at a very special old register signed by many international guests of the hotel that was once located in the building. Be sure to ask to see it when you visit

Asolo-Kilim-001

Colorful and eclectic art and objects at Asolo Kilim Gallery

 

Seen from many vantage points in the area and in town, La Rocca, the city’s ancient fortress, sits prominently atop Mount Ricco. A defining landmark of the Asolo landscape that can be seen for many miles, we always knew when we were getting close to “home” returning from our nearby Veneto excursions.

Above the trees — La Rocca atop Mount Ricco seen from Piazza Garibaldi

Above the trees — La Rocca atop Mount Ricco seen from Piazza Garibaldi

As we walked to the top, there was a mild, but steady winding climb providing good exercise and wonderful views. Although the fortress wasn’t open to visitors that day, we enjoyed the stunning 360 degree views of the hills and valleys of the area from the hilltop location.

on top of Mount Ricco - La Rocca

on top of Mount Ricco – La Rocca

 

The women of Asolo

Guided by the lovely and knowledgeable women of Asolo today, BellAsolo guide Laura Serafin and Discovering Veneto representative Francesca Zuccolotto, we got an introduction to three remarkable women of Asolo past — Freya Stark, Caterina Cornaro, and Elenora Duse. Each of these amazing women are central characters in the stories of Asolo as officially documented in guides and books, but also in the stories of locals who have personal recollections or those passed down in family history.

With Laura Serafin (left) and Francesca Zuccolotto at Villa Freya

With Laura Serafin (left) and Francesca Zuccolotto at Villa Freya

Touring the gardens of Villa Freya we learned about Freya Stark, British journalist and avid world traveler. Freya was a solo woman traveler pioneer who traversed the Middle East and other distant lands beginning in the 1930s. She had come to Asolo as a child near the beginning of the twentieth century and chose to return later in life because she loved the town. Freya died there in 1993 at the age of 100 and is buried in Asolo at the Cemetery of Sant’Anna.

In the gardens of Villa Freya

In the gardens of Villa Freya

The gardens in the large area behind the villa were beautiful with a wide diversity of flora, some varieties brought here by Freya from her travels. Although much of it was in bloom, the long rows of its popular English roses were not yet budding. Behind the garden are ruins of a Roman theater and views down into the valleys below.

On the grounds at Queen Cornaro’s Castle; Bell tower of Asolo Cathedral visible on the right

On the grounds at Queen Cornaro’s Castle; Bell tower of Asolo Cathedral visible on the right

Married at the age of 14 and widowed at 19, Caterina Cornaro (1454 – 1510) ruled Cyprus as queen for 15 years before being deposed by Venetian merchants in 1489. It was then that she came to Asolo, retaining the title of queen and had her palace built just up the hill from Piazza Garibaldi. It was quite an occasion when she arrived in Asolo, an event commemorated annually with a festival that includes many donning fancy 15th-century attire. Queen Caterina hosted Renaissance artists and intellectuals during her reign giving Asolo the early distinction of being a center of literature and the creative arts. An interesting connection to the United States is that the theater built there in 1798 was dismantled and stored in 1930, then purchased by the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art to be reassembled and reconstructed in Sarasota, Florida in the 1950s where it has been in use ever since.

Elenora Duse (1858- 1924) was an actress called “Divine” by her fans. She had said of Asolo, the place in which she chose to live, that it was a “small town of lace and poetry”.  A theater named after her is located in Queen Cornaro’s Castle. She is highly regarded as one of the great actors of the period and was reviewed favorably in comparison to her contemporary and rival, the acclaimed Sarah Bernhardt. Fitting our theme of romance, Elenora was celebrated for her acting but she was also known for her famous romances. Like Freya, Elenora is buried at the Cemetery of Sant’Anna.

A taste of Asolo

Although it may be tempting to stay in the comfortable Elena apartment for all meals, there are great dining options within a few minutes (some a minute or two) walk from there. From our experiences, we can recommend these places for wining and dining.

Caffé Centrale

How lucky we were that Caffé Centrale, an important center of Asolo’s culture, was in the same building as our apartment. But I would have made it a point to go there even if it wasn’t so convenient. Over scrumptious croissants and cappuccino, Mr. TWS and I reveled in thoughts of the many literary figures and celebrities who frequented the cafe and who have been memorialized with their names on the red director’s chairs on the patio of Caffé Centrale. During our breakfast ritual, we could imagine a young Hemingway in the 1920s writing a novel while sitting there. Besides our morning breakfast ritual, we also had a great lunch of lasagna and salads sitting on the patio on a gorgeous sunny afternoon, an afternoon gelato, and a late night liqueur.

 

Caffè Centrale, a meeting place for literary greats and celebrities of the past and present

Caffè Centrale, a meeting place for literary greats and celebrities of the past and present

Lele and Ezio Botter are the two brothers who own and operate the bustling cafe. We enjoyed a chance to sit down with Lele who graciously shared part of his busy day and enthralled us with marvelous stories of Asolo’s celebrity residents and visitors during his years of working at the cafe as well as those found in records and original letters dating back to 1796, some of which are in the cafe’s possession. From those documents they learned that the building was initially an exclusive club for noblemen, but much to the patrons’ dismay the owner opened it to others because the owner said that others will pay, the noblemen don’t. Among his stories, was one of Napoleon and a plot ostensibly to kill him that was centered in Asolo and particularly the club. The club was closed for several years (reopening as a coffee shop) and the conspiracy suspects were imprisoned. He also mentioned that a descendant of Robert Browning had visited just a few days earlier.

Antica Osteria Al Bacaro

Smiling service and delicious simple Italian dishes at Osteria Al Bacaro

Smiling service and delicious simple Italian dishes at Osteria Al Bacaro

 

Al Bacaro is a small osteria on Via Browning that has been operating since 1892. It was one of our favorite Asolo experiences. In fact, we went there twice to enjoy the ambiance of a spot frequented by Asolani (as locals are called) as well as the local delicious cuisine and very friendly service.

Trattoria Due Mori

For dinner with a spectacular view, reserve a window table at Trattoria Due Mori. Everything during our long, leisurely dinner from the appetizers to the tiramisu was excellent.

Dining with a view at Trattoria Moderna Due Mori

Dining with a view at Trattoria Moderna Due Mori

 

Tappo Bar

Our choice for our last dinner in Asolo was Tappo Bar a few steps across the piazza from our apartment. The meal was very good as was the service and it appeared that the other customers were locals.

Perfect combination — pasta and tiramisu (one of the best we’ve had) at Tappo Bar

Perfect combination — pasta and tiramisu (one of the best we’ve had) at Tappo Bar

Farewell to Asolo

We said our goodbyes to our lovely and gracious host Elena over afternoon tea at the Hotel Villa Cipriani. The villa was once owned by Robert Browning who bought it in 1889 shortly before he died. Passed on to his son, subsequent owners transformed the property into a country inn (including the famous Guinness family of Ireland) before Giuseppe Cipriani took over management and it became Hotel Villa Cipriani. The hotel is just a short walk from Elena’s apartments and is a perfect place for tea time and a walk in the garden to admire the views of the surrounding countryside.

Elena at Hotel Cipriani

Elena at Hotel Cipriani

 

On our last night in Asolo, Mr. TWS and I stopped in for a nightcap of Amaro Montenegro (an Italian herbal liqueur) at Caffé Centrale, trying to prolong the night and our stay. We were already missing romantic Asolo

Caffé Centrale on our final night in Asolo

Caffé Centrale on our final night in Asolo

What else to see and do during a stay in Asolo

In a future post, we’ll be talking about some of the excursions we took outside of Asolo that included art, architecture, wine, and beautiful towns. There are many outdoor activities like golfing, hiking, biking, boating that are available nearby. In the city center, there are flea markets every second Sunday of the month throughout the year. Asolo also plays host to special annual events such as Palio di Asolo (late June) and the Asolo Art Film Festival (August 29th to September 7th in 2016).

Distances from Asolo to key cities

Treviso – 30 km
Venice – 51 km
Verona – 81 km
Padova – 40 km
Vicenza – 39 km

Highlights of four nights in Asolo, Italy — a beautiful and romantic town on a hilltop in Italy’s Veneto region. Where to eat, sleep, and see the sights.

By Catherine Sweeney may 2016